Deployment of Anglo-American forces 1942

Deployment of Anglo-American forces by theaters in summer 1942.

British 6-pounder anti-tank gun ready to fire

British 6-pounder anti-tank gun ready to fire in North Africa.

Deployment of the armed forces of the Anglo-Americans (Britain with Commonwealth and United States) by theaters of war (Europe, Middle East, Atlantic) in summer 1942 according to nominal (paper) strengths.

British flagBRITISH AND COMMONWEALTH FORCES

British and Commonwealth Forces: Divisions
Theaters of War Coastal defense, Airborne Motorized Infantry Armoured
8th Army (Western Desert) - 5 2
8th Army (Fortress Tobruk) - 1 2/3 1/3
British troops Egypt - 2/3 1
Shipping transfer to 8th Army - 1 1
9th Army (Palestine) - 1 2/3
10th Army (Iraq) - 2 1
Cyprus - 1/3
Great Britain 8 26 2 1/3
in UK for Operation Torch - 1 1
Reinforcements for 8th Army for time of Second Alamein - 3 1/3 (2 from UK) 2 2/3 (from UK)
TOTAL 8 42 2/3 11 1/3
British and Commonwealth Forces: Infantry
Theaters of War Infantry (rifle men) automatic rifles sub-machine guns machine guns mortars light anti-tank weapons
8th Army (Western Desert) 43,089 - ? 5,285 1,246
8th Army (Fortress Tobruk) 13,274 - ? 1,602 389
8th Army (Fortress Tobruk) "8 130" - ? 1,052 223
Shipping transfer to 8th Army 10,569 - ? 1,342 296
9th Army (Palestine) 12,190 - ? 1,920 363
10th Army (Iraq) 17,886 - ? 2,209 514
Cyprus 2,439 - ? 289 73
Great Britain 257,450 - ? 33,785 7,506
in UK for Operation Torch 10,569 - ? 1,727 296
Reinforcements for 8th Army for time of Second Alamein 33,058 - ? 4,610 883
TOTAL 408,696 - ? 53,821 11,789
Theaters of War Tanks Assault Guns, AFV's APC's Trucks Feld guns AT guns AA guns
8th Army (Western Desert) 347 - 1,456 13,710 456 336 344
8th Army (Fortress Tobruk) 58 - 455 4,082 136 96 98
8th Army (Fortress Tobruk) 174 - 259 2,899 96 80 86
Shipping transfer to 8th Army 174 - 344 3,618 120 96 102
9th Army (Palestine) - 426 3,595 120 80 80
10th Army (Iraq) 174 - 600 5.776 192 144 150
Cyprus - - 85 719 16 16 16
Great Britain 580 52 7,109 60,512 2,400 2,238 1,794
in UK for Operation Torch 201 26 151 3,626 120 250 102
Reinforcements for 8th Army for time of Second Alamein 758 52 1,155 10,129 312 564 268
TOTAL 2,466 130 12,040 108,666 3,968 3,900 3,040

us flagUS FORCES

US Forces: Divisions
Theaters of War Garrison and Airborne divisions (partly) motorized Infantry Armoured
Eastern USA - ca. 10 ca. 3
Deployed for Operation Torch - 4 3
Iceland 1 -
TOTAL 1 14 6
US Forces: Infantry
Theaters of War Infantry (rifle men) automatic rifles sub-machine guns machine guns mortars light anti-tank weapons
Eastern USA 85,140 ? ? 3,079 1,518 7,391
Deployed for Operation Torch 36,120 ? ? 1,306 690 3,678
Iceland 7,740 ? ? 280 138 557
TOTAL 129,000 ? ? 4,665 2,364 11,626
US Forces: Vehicles and Artillery
Theaters of War Tanks Assault Guns, AFV's APC's Trucks Feld guns AT guns AA guns
Eastern USA 681 402 1,553 20,100 480 1,171
Deployed for Operation Torch 590 312 549 9,934 192 490
Iceland - 24 - - 48 109
TOTAL 1,271 738 2,102 30,034 600 1,700

Deployment of the Air Forces

Strength of RAF
Theaters of War Fighters Fighter-bombers light and medium Bombers Heavy Bombers
Great Britain c.1,188 c.540 c.820 c.396
Iceland and USA - - c.24
Middle East c.144 c.288 c.386 c.36
Malta c.90 - c.18
Gibraltar and West Africa c.18 - c.16
TOTAL 1,440 828 1,264 432

The figures for the US Air Force based on the figures of the US Army Air Force in December 1941.

US Army Air Force
Theaters of War Fighters Fighter-bombers light and medium Bombers Heavy Bombers
Eastern USA c.651 - c.463 c.86

Deployment of Navies

Strength of Royal Navy
Theaters of War Battleships Heavy Cruisers Light Cruisers Fleet Carriers Light and Escort Carriers Destroyers Escorts MTBs Subs Merchant Fleet
Home Waters UK 1 c.41 (incl. light) (with heavy) 1 c.3 c.67 c.242 ? c. 18 ?
Iceland, US, Convoy PQ-17 2 6 (incl. light) (with heavy) 1 - 23 4 ? 2 34
Middle East 1 c.8 (incl. light) (with heavy) - c.1 c.30 c.4 c.10 c.10 ?
Malta - - - - - - - ? c.10 ?
Gibraltar, West Africa 2 c.4 (incl. light) (with heavy) 2 - c.10 - ? - ?
TOTAL 6 (+5 Far East + 2 under Repair for 1+ year) c.10 (+ 2 Far East) c.41 (+5 Far East) 4 4 (+1-2 Far East) c.130 (+20 Far East) c.250 ? c.40 (+15 Far East) c.9,787 worldwide (c.19.095m t) incl. Commonwealth, Belgium, Greece, Dutch, Norway
Theaters of War Battleships Heavy Cruisers Light Cruisers Fleet Carriers Light and Escort Carriers Destroyers Escorts MTBs Subs Merchant Fleet
US East Coast 7 3 9 1 7 76 46 - c.40 c.3,000 (worldwide c. 11.763m t)

Today’s War Diary and Report Feeds

Today 75 and 100 years ago and daily World War Report:

Diary April 24, 1943

Kurt Freiherr von Hammerstein-Equord

Kurt Freiherr von Hammerstein-Equord (1878-1943), 1929 Chief of the troop office.

WW2 War Diary for Saturday, April 24, 1943:

Home Front

Germany: Death of Lieutenant-General Kurt von Hammerstein-Equart, former COGS and leading anti-Nazi conspirator; aged 64.
Britain: IRA leaders, McAteer and Steele, commandeer Broadway Cinema, Belfast, and make propaganda speeches; then escape (Lord Haw-Haw later broadcasts this news from Germany).

Sea War

Mediterranean: British submarine Sahib sunk off Stromboli by Italian corvette Gabbiano and German bomber.

Diary April 24, 1918

A7V "Elfriede"

A7V “Elfriede” was disabled by four shots of the 6-pounder of an Mark IV tank and captured,

World War One Diary for Wednesday, April 24, 1918:

Western Front

Somme: 2 German divisions with 13 tanks (2 lost) capture Villers­-Bretonneux (over 390 PoWs) and threaten Allied junction in Amiens sector. First tank-vs-tank action: a British Mk IV ‘Male’ (Mitchell) knocks out German A7V Elfriede (after it disables 2 ‘Females’), which is then captured; 7 British Whippet light tanks (1 lost) run down 400 German infantry.

Eastern Front

Finland: 8,000 Red Guards and 10 guns vainly try to retake Lahti from 800 German troops until April 29.
Manchuria: Colonel Semenov’s White Cossacks defeat 500 armed Hungarian PoWs, drive them towards Chita.

Africa

Mozambique: Kartucol push checked at Mbalama Hill, but Captain Brodie’s reconnaissance party storm observation post and force German retreat on April 25. Rosecol advances on Koronje and Nanungu (April 27-29), Kartucol takes over on April 30.

Mortier de 370 Filloux

French flagFrench heavy 370-mm howitzer Mortier de 370 Filloux.
History, development, service, specification, and pictures.

Mortier de 370 Filloux

A French 370-mm howitzer Mortier de 370 Filloux in position in the Ravin de la Baraquette west of Foucaucourt, September 1916.

History

The Mortier de 370 Filloux had its ori­gins in a specification regarding a coastal artil­lery gun able to produce plunging shells in order to cut the comparatively thinner armour of warship decks. By 1913 several of these short howitzers that fired at higher angles of elevation was manufactured, however in 1913 the 370-mm (14.57-in) gun was ready which continued to be afterwards the heaviest of all these French coastal artillery pieces.

To look at the Mortier de 370 Filloux it had been a sneakily compact gun. The truth is it had been incredible. It had initially been created for deployment in sta­tic coastal emplacements where – on paper certainly – it was to have been transported, emplaced and there after left.

What in fact occurred was that at that time after the first bloody battles of 1914, the French army hurried no matter what it could discover in the heavy artillery park towards the zones behind the front lines as a way to get some trench­-crushing potential, nevertheless minimal.
The good news is for the French, in the event the Mortier de 370 had been manufactured it included specific handling equipment of a pair of varieties. One was for deployment on railway carriages and the second one for street transportation and each received handling gantries, cranes and special rigs. The biggest of these rigs had been for the barrel, which was transported slung under a special wheeled gantry; the other loads had been moved slung in the same way. Overall there have been 3 primary loads with additional for the ammo as well as the numerous components.

If travelling the Mortier de 370 wasn’t enough, emplacing the howitzer had been even worse. The groundwork started with the excavating of a big hole into which was lowered the primary firing platform: this was built with a number of vertical spades on its bottom which were created to absorb a portion of the barrel recoil. Additional recoil had been consumed by the weighty carriage, which was connected to the platform and included a basic recoil cylinder system linked to the trunnions of the barrel. The emplace­ment and installation of all this required a considerable time and significant amounts of labour, however it was the price the French had to spend to be able to place some kind of heavy artillery right in front during 1915-16.

As soon as in the front line the ammo for the howitzer had been bit by bit improved from the authentic armour-piercing pat­tern to a heavy blast-producing shell; the last of these projectiles had been intro­duced into action during 1917. There were a pair of these 1917 type projec­tiles, the bulkier weighing 489 kg (l,078lb). However with this the range was just 8,100 m (8,860 yards), which generated all the work required somewhat a waste of potentiaL However for a long time it had been all that there was available and the unlucky French gunners simply had to deal with it all.

Following 1918 the Mortiers de 370 Fil­loux had been put into reserve to be pulled out once again in the ‘Phoney War’ of 1939-1940. There then happens to be several indecision regarding ex­actly where they were to be em­placed, and in the event the majority of them had been obviously wiped out by Luft­waffe strikes.


Specification Mortier de 370 Filloux

Mortier de 370 Filloux
Mortier de 370 Filloux Specification
Type heavy howitzer
Crew ?
Calibre 14.57 in (370 mm)
Length of barrel 10 ft 3 in (3.31 m)
Weight between 63,934 lb and 66,139 lb (29,000-30,000 kg) in action
Elevation -6° to +65°
Traverse
Muzzle velocity light shell 1,214 ft/s (370 m/s); heavy shell 1,037 ft/s (316 m/s)
Maximum range light shell 11,375 yards (10,400 m); heavy shell 8,860 yards (8,100 m)
Shell weight 911.6 lb (413.5 kg) or 1,078 lb (489 kg)
Production delivery 1913
Total production ?
Service delivery Western Front 1915
at Verdun in May 1916 4